Our Exact Formula for Creating a Mood Board

Jun 7

As creatives, mood boards are a crucial first step to our design process and can be such an amazing tool for visualizing the look and direction of a project. From custom client work to new website templates or Instagram feed grids, we utilize mood boards to start virtually everything at IDCO.

Mood boards also come in very handy when prepping for a portfolio photo shoot. Click here to read up on our shoot prep checklist.  By crafting a mood board before the shoot, this ensures your photographer understands the vibe you are going for, how you expect your images to be edited and bonus, it acts as a mini shot list.

 

Our Exact Formula for Creating a Mood Board | Creative Office Styling | The Identite Collective

Photography: Madeline Harper Photography

For interior designers, mood boards are an integral part of the creative process and are perfect for shaping client inspiration before the design work begins. Pulling from your client’s Pinterest board, we like to use a 30:70 ratio. So your mood board should consist of roughly 30% client images and 70% images that you sourced.

 

Our Exact Formula for Creating a Mood Board | mood board essential elements | The Identite Collective

 

We have a formula we use each time we craft a visual storyboard and thought it might help anyone looking to create your own. Below you’ll find the list of elements we always include as well as etiquette for sourcing images and the best source for stock images. 

 

 

Our perfect mood board formula

 

 

  • 2 Interiors Shots – These images can be from your own portfolio of work or inspirational interiors from others.

 

  • 1 Product Shot – For product shots, we like to use images with a white background and a closeup of the product detail.

 

  • 2 Landscape Shots –  Exterior shots, a hotel, a desert, a beach – anything with colors that represent your brand works well for this category.

 

  • 2 Texture Shots – We like to think outside the box with our texture shots. For example, a close up of a leaf, peeling paint, running water. Just like with landscape shots, choose images with colors and feelings of what your brand represents.

 

When choosing images for your mood board, be sure to select photos in a variety of depths. By varying detail or close up shots with wide full-room shots, you will add dimension to your mood board, and thus, a more precise definition of the project.

Our Exact Formula for Creating a Mood Board | brand mood board | The Identite Collective

Our Exact Formula for Creating a Mood Board | Creative Office Styling | The Identite Collective

Photography: Madeline Harper Photography

 

Our Exact Formula for Creating a Mood Board | mood board with peach hues | The Identite Collective

 

 

Etiquette

 

When you are utilizing images from other sources, there are a few best practices to follow for crediting. For mood boards being published on a blog, website, or Instagram, be sure to credit the original source, designer and photographer of each image. If just sharing with clients, it’s not as important, but it’s imperative that you can go back and access the source in the future. So we like to keep hidden Pinterest boards with all our mood board images for ease of access.

Our Exact Formula for Creating a Mood Board | interior design mood board | The Identite Collective

Our Exact Formula for Creating a Mood Board | mood board Styling | The Identite Collective

 

 

Our Source for Great Stock Images

 

If you are planning to publish your mood board, we love using Unsplash.com for free stock images. They have a vast collection of environment, detail, and texture shots that you can mix in with your portfolio images for a really beautiful visual.

 


 

 

For more info on creative business strategy and design, be sure to check out these posts:

 

Erin Lepperd is an interior designer – turned digital media editor with a penchant for breathtaking interiors. When she’s not gabbing about design, you’ll find her wrangling her wild and wonderful 5-year-old twins, brunching like it’s her job and exploring the wilds of New England as a California transplant.

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